Education

Kriol Sound Chart Poster

An updated colourful Kriol sound chart with words and pictures to illustrate each sound. The poster has been developed with the Meigim Kriol Strongbala program in the Ngukurr community.  For more details visit:  https://meigimkriolstrongbala.org.au/en_au/resource/kriol-elfabet-poster/ 
Select a size and add laminating to your poster

GIJA Plants and Animals

Aboriginal flora and fauna knowledge from the east Kimberley, north Australia

This book is the result of a study of Gija plant and animal knowledge conducted by biocultutral knowledge custodians with a linguist and biologist are presented. Gija names and uses of plants and animals, specific names and common English names of 215 plants and 247 animals are included. Introductory chapters outline Gija knowledge of seasons, nomenclature for implements, weapons and tools, plant life-forms, and habitats and provide insights into Gija observations of country changes and concerns about country. Gija biological knowledge is categorised and discussed in later chapters.

LANGUAGE, LAND AND SONG

Studies in honour of Luise Hercus

Language, land, stories and songs are closely entwined in many societies around the world. Documenting all of these is now recognised as an essential part of language work, and flows into contemporary concerns for making material accessible through language maintenance and archiving activities. 

Belaa Plants and Animals

Biocultural knowledge of the Kwini people of the far north Kimberley, Australia

This book mainly documents the Belaa language, however, any of the words used may be the same or similar to those used by people from the Forrest River area and other parts of Balanggarra country. 

This book is a powerful testament to the depth and complexity of the biocultural knowledge of the Kwini elders who wrote this book. It is also an indication of the successful passing-on of detailed plant and animal knowledge for thousands of generations. This book forms a new unbreakable link in a chain of knowledge tranmission reaching back to the Dreamtime.

We Always Stay

We Always Stay contains the stories of seven remarkable teachers from remote communities in central Australia. All of these teachers speak, read and write in at least their own language as well as English. Many of them are multilingual in several Aboriginal languages. All of the teachers have worked in their respective schools in the communities of Yuendumu, Nyirrpi, Ntaria (Hermannsburg), Papunya and Areyonga, for over 30 years in a range of capacities. All of these women have completed a four year teaching degree and are fully qualified classroom teachers.

Gurindji Sign Language Poster #2

Our language Gurindji is spoken in the Victoria River District of northern Australia. Sign language called ‘takataka’ is an important part of communication for us. We use it to talk to people a long way away, and sign is also used to communicate with people who are deaf. Here are some of our signs! You can also watch us demonstrating the signs through the QR codes with your mobile phone. The posters were produced by Jennifer Green, Cassandra Algy and Felicity Meakins through Karungkarni Art. See links to the other 3 posters or the full set in this series: http://batchelorpress.com/node/369 http://batchelorpress.com/node/371 http://batchelorpress.com/node/372 http://batchelorpress.com/node/373

Language: 

Nga-ni Kun-red Ngarduk Man-djewk Na-kudji 'A Year in my Country'

A year in my country

This book tells a story about the life of Kune people who live near the community of Maningrida in north-central Arnhem Land, Australia. This is rich hunting country, abundant in plant and animal life, that shifts and changes through the yearly seasonal cycle.

Language: 

NGUÑ KOONGURRUKUÑ

Speak Koongurrukuñ

'Language is the very essence of Aboriginal identity.' These are Ida Bishop's words and they embody the reason why this work is of such great importance. 

This work is important because it provides a written, permanent record of a rich indigenous language which would otherwise in time disappear with the passing on of its oral custodians.

It is important also because the author, as a speaker of the language, has produced a written form of Koongurrukuñ with a depth and sensitivity impossible for an outside researcher.

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